Monday, 15 July 2019

BBC smears of Corbyn, and Colin Wallace (Jul. 15, 2019)

    The BBC’s War on Corbyn – Panorama would have made Pravda Proud
    Posted by johnlilburne on July 15, 2019, 8:16 pm

    https://azvsas.blogspot.com/2019/07/the-bbcs-war-on-corbyn-panorama-would.html


      Colin Wallace
      Posted by ken on July 15, 2019, 8:44 pm, in reply to "The BBC’s War on Corbyn – Panorama would have made Pravda Proud"

      I tried to read ref 35 about Colin Wallace as it's a case I followed as it developed.

      It's from the Spectator and Paul Foots investigation.

      A few seconds after seeing the page it gets darkened out and a browser massage saying 'site insecure'.

      Can anyone read ref 35.

      Thanks


        Re: Colin Wallace
        Posted by redadare on July 15, 2019, 8:59 pm, in reply to "Colin Wallace"

        I've got the book "Who Killed Colin Wallace". Not sure if what you are referring to is in the book but tell me what it is you are looking for and I'll see if its there.


          Re: Colin Wallace
          Posted by Keith-264 on July 15, 2019, 9:25 pm, in reply to "Colin Wallace"

          https://www.lobster-magazine.co.uk/intro/search.cgi?zoom_query=colin+wallace&zoom_and=1

          There might be something here.

          Clio the cat, ? July 1997 - 1 May 2016
          Kira the cat, ? ? 2010 - 3 August 2018


            Clicked on ref 35 and managed to save this letter - before blackout
            Posted by johnlilburne on July 15, 2019, 10:08 pm, in reply to "Colin Wallace"

            Sir: John Ware, the former Sun reporter who now works for the BBC, no doubt owes much of his skill and flair as a writer to his days with his old newspaper. No- where is this more evident than in his ongoing attempts to discredit my allega- tions about Intelligence malpractices dur- ing the 1970s. But is John Ware himself a reliable and impartial witness in this mat- ter?

            Mr Ware was co-author of a series of articles in the Independent in 1987 which purported to be an 'investigation' into the allegations which I and a former Army Intelligence Officer, Captain Fred Hol- royd, had made about what we believed to be unlawful activities by some members of the Intelligence community in Ulster dur- ing the mid-1970s. Although Mr Ware did not take the trouble to speak to me during the course of his 'investigations' for the Independent, he subsequently wrote a piece under the heading, 'Parachutist who was all waffle and no action'. The story simply attempted to discredit my credibil- ity and had nothing whatsoever to do with my allegations about Intelligence 'dirty tricks' activities.

            As a result of a complaint made by me about the overall article, the Press Council investigated Mr Ware's story and adjudi- cated that it was 'quite irresponsible'. Not to be put off by such damning criticism from the Press Council, Mr Ware now sees himself as the victim of 'a growing number of uncritical and unsceptical MPs and journalists, and even the Press Couticil itself. It is, however, ironic and not a little absurd that Mr Ware should now have the audacity to put himself forward in The Spectator once more as a credible commen- tator on the subject.

            In his article (The Secret Life of Walter Mitty', 24 March) Mr Ware refers to my work as Senior Information Officer at Army Headquarters in Northern Ireland during the 1970s and says: Many of those who knew him then believe he is a 'Walter Mitty' — a kind of military groupie. But since the Government's admis- sion, he had begun to acquire an aura of serious mystery, and the status of a martyr and a saint.

            What Mr Ware now says he and a few of his associates may or may not have thought of me in the 1970s is of little importance. What is important, however, is what the Army, particularly those who lived and worked with me, thought of me during the period and what they recorded in official reports. For example the authorities have now admitted that in 1974, when I was only 29 years of age, I was the youngest senior information officer in the Ministry of De- fence and by then had been recommended for the MBE on three occasions. My Army Annual Confidential Reports for that year contain the following comments: `For knowledge, loyalty, professional- ism, Mr Wallace is in a class of his own.' `He is irreplaceable.'

            `One of the most effective personal contributions of any to the standing and reputation of the Army in these troubles.'

            The sharp contrast between the above comments, which were written by senior serving Army officers, and those made by Mr Ware says more about his impartiality and credibility than I or the Press Council ever could.

            Colin Wallace

            14 Dalloway Road, Arundel, West Sussex

      Sunday, 14 July 2019

      Key's Snub of Venezuela (Mar. 8, 2013)



        • Populuxe125.2
          I am not right wing – I don’t give a flying fuck about petty ideological bickering. I have a vision of ideal governance being a liberal democracy with effective welfare, public institutions, free press, independent judiciary, and human rights and liberties to be universal and protected by constitutional law. Anything that diverges from this is only going to get my contempt and scorn, left wing OR right wing, and Hugo Chavez definitely qualifies. No why don’t you sing a rousing chorus of “Don’t Cry For Me, Venezuela” while they embalm his corpse as a tourist attraction.
          • Morrissey25.2.1
            I am not right wing – I don’t give a flying fuck about petty ideological bickering.
            Oh yes, you go for the really big issues, of course. Like loudly repeating the black propaganda of the British establishment at its most vicious and corrupt.
            I have a vision of ideal governance being a liberal democracy with effective welfare, public institutions, free press,
            That’s even odder than the claim to not “give a flying fuck” about petty bickering; I seem to remember you joining in the British government-led character assassination campaign against Julian Assange. When did you change to supporting a free press as opposed to trying to shut it down and persecute journalists?
            …independent judiciary,…
            Like the outstandingly independent Swedish judiciary perhaps?
            … and human rights and liberties to be universal and protected by constitutional law.
            But not for dissenting journalists, of course. Gotta have limits, don’t we!
            As for your risible comments about Hugo Chavez: I don’t care how mean-spirited and callous you are, but your flagrant lying is something else entirely.
            • McFlock25.2.1.1
              Intentional derail, or just your derailed thinking?
              Even if – and a big fucking if – you were correct on the Assange issue, disagreement on that single issue does not negate his statement about his own general belief system.
            • McFlock25.2.1.2
              pop’s own statement about his belief system. Missing that edit function ðŸ™‚
            • Populuxe125.2.1.3
              Julian Assange is not a journalist – journalists may well avail themselves of Wikileaks in their research, but Assange exhibits very little editorial process or evidence of fact checking in his activities to constitute journalism. Also, as regards my emphasis on constitutional human rights, I happen to believe that if a person accuses someone of a violation of their person, they should have the right to an investigation and a trial. The rest of your frothing is just a rather sad attempt at deflection.
              • Colonial Viper25.2.1.3.1
                You may not regard Julian Assange as a journalist but he is at a minimum, a publisher.
                I happen to believe that if a person accuses someone of a violation of their person, they should have the right to an investigation and a trial.
                So do I.
                Can someone guarantee that Assange will actually get to that trial, and if convicted of violating another person, gets to serve out his prescribed sentence? (As opposed to being whisked away on completely unrelated matters?)
                • McFlock25.2.1.3.1.1
                  Those who do not learn from history are destined to repeat it.
                  This is a derail.
                  If you really want to rehash it, we should go to open mike. But promise me you actually have something new.
                • Populuxe125.2.1.3.1.2
                  I can’t guarantee that Assange will actually get to trial because he’s doing his darnedest not to get there – in any case this belongs in Open Mike.
                • Colonial Viper25.2.1.3.1.3
                  yeah plus I think this one has been done to death.
                  Having said that…its only a minor derail…will the next Venezuelan administration view Assange as favourably???
              • Morrissey25.2.1.3.2
                Julian Assange is not a journalist – journalists may well avail themselves of Wikileaks in their research, but Assange exhibits very little editorial process or evidence of fact checking in his activities to constitute journalism.
                So does the New York Times. Unlike much of the output of that semi-official state outlet, nothing that Assange has released has been proven to be false. That’s the trouble with Assange of course, and that’s why he must be obliterated. (Goddamn those Ecuadorian paisanos!!!)
                Also, as regards my emphasis on constitutional human rights, I happen to believe that if a person accuses someone of a violation of their person, they should have the right to an investigation and a trial.
                A couple of young women were manipulated or forced to make a spurious allegation against him. They both retracted the ludicrous allegation, but the Swedish prosecutor ignored that fact.
                The rest of your frothing is just a rather sad attempt at deflection.
                I think anybody who reads this and other conflicts I have engaged in with you can see quite plainly who is lying.
                • McFlock25.2.1.3.2.1
                  trool.
                • Populuxe125.2.1.3.2.2
                  The New York Times isn’t a semi-official state outlet, it’s a privately owned company.Take it to Open Mike, I’ll kick your arse there.
                  • Morrissey
                    The New York Times isn’t a semi-official state outlet, it’s a privately owned company.
                    It’s privately owned, but it’s the conduit for government propaganda.
                    Take it to Open Mike, I’ll kick your arse there.
                    Suddenly you’ll become Superman?
              • Murray Olsen25.2.1.3.3
                The Cuban terrorist Luis Posada Carriles was denied the right to a fair trial in Venezuela after being accused of participating in several terrorist activities. Why? Because the Americans protected him and refused to extradite him to a country where they claimed he ran the risk of torture.
        • Funny how all these comments reinforce the diversionary nature of all of the anti comments in this post.
          The essence is that Key is being a tool in refusing to go to Chavez’s funeral. Whether or not people agree with Chavez’s world view or his actions he was a respected world leader and Key could do really well for our country’s interests to go to the funeral. It is just a couple of days in his life. Not going is so naif.
          • Murray Olsen25.3.1
            I agree wholeheartedly. Many in Latin America will take this as a deliberate insult. Helen Clark did some good work there in raising our profile, while Key has worn a silly hat, ogled the Mexican first lady, and insulted Venezuela. I find it revealing that so many contributors, some of whom I have never seen before, use the discussion on this to attempt an unneeded assassination of Chavez.
        • geoff25.4
          Too right, MickyS, I was just thinking that myself. They can’t argue the points so they attack the person.
      1. TheContrarian26
        “The righties then launch into attempted character assassinations of him but ignore the good that he achieved.”
        Personally I am ambivalent towards Chavez – he did good but also did things not so good. You’re comment could just as easily read:
        “The lefties then launch into attempted character praise of him but ignore the bad that he did.”
        • Colonial Viper26.1
          He curtailed judicial and press freedoms. Opposition groups and parties were frequently harrassed. Institutions were weakened, and law and order issues and corruption became increasingly disruptive.
          • Populuxe126.1.1
            Thanks for being big about it, and yes he did a lot in terms of increasing the standard of living for the poor, but with all the weakening of those other institutions, what kind of a future has Chavez left them?
            • Colonial Viper26.1.1.1
              It’s a big question. We’re going to see what internal and external pressures emergy on Venezuela over the next several years. As other people have noted, the true Chavez legacy may not be known for another decade.
              • Populuxe126.1.1.1.1
                My main problem with it is that by making those revisions to the constitution, should a right wing populist get into power there will be little to check them. My main difficulty with populist politics is it tends to reduce the electorate to a Pavlovian entity to be bribed, rather than equals to be reasoned with.
                • Jim Davis26.1.1.1.1.1
                  He didn’t ‘bribe’ the electorate, he empowered the poor and redistributed the proceeds of the country’s oil wealth to reducing poverty and inequality.
                  • Populuxe1
                    Um, for improving their lot he charged a fairly hefty price in politicising the electoral college and basically giving himself the constitutional power to be president for life – after all you can’t really vote for an alternative if there is no real alternative. That’s like saying National’s tax cuts or Labour’s tax free student loans weren’t bribes.
                    • Colonial Viper
                      Oh bullshit. Venezuela’s last election had an over 80% turn out rate.
                      That leaves NZ’s “democracy” in the dust.
                      • Populuxe1
                        Well, no. And it dropped significantly when compulsory voting was rescinded.
                        http://www.idea.int/vt/countryview.cfm?CountryCode=VE
                        • Colonial Viper
                          Hmmm, try the recent 2012 presidential elections.
                          With 90% of the ballots counted Sunday night, Chavez has 54.42% of the vote compared with 44.97% for Capriles, according to Tibisay Lucena, president of the National Electoral Council.
                          Chavez had secured 7.4 million votes and Capriles 6.1 million votes, election officials said.
                          The country saw one of its highest participation rates in decades, with almost 81% of voters going to the polls, Lucena said.
                          In fact, some polls were kept open two hours after their scheduled closing because lines of voters were waiting for ballots.
          • TheContrarian26.1.2
            Agree (though I wasn’t specifically referring to you CV)
        • geoff26.2
          No. The lefties attempt to point out the success of Venezuela under Chavez and the righties attempt to smear Chavez.
          I couldn’t give a fuck about Chavez the person, I’m only interested in the undeniable success of his change to socialist policies. If scoailist policies managed to succeed even under the weight of a corrupt, dictator then imagine how successful they would be in a modern western democracy?
          Oh that’s right, we already know how successful they would be, it’s called Scandinavia.
          • Murray Olsen26.2.1
            Remember that it’s the weight of a “corrupt dictator” plus all the destabilisation efforts of the US and the traitorous elite inside Venezuela. This makes the successes even more notable. In many ways, Venezuela has been going forwards while countries such as our own have been going backwards.
            • Colonial Viper26.2.1.1
              We criticise Chavez now for highly executive, arbitrary and un-reviewed decision making. But he was a man who knew that things had to change, and not on geologic timescales. And I’m betting you that he relied a whole lot on his cabinet’s creativity and heavy lifting.
              Research shows that between 0 and 5 years of age, the prospects of a new person either brighten or dim considerably, in terms of both educational and social achievement. If Chavez had dicked around with white papers and blue papers and green papers, especially after 2 decades of dramatic declines in living standards for most Venezuelans (I mean, we are talking catastrophic poverty levels in 1998) he wouldn’t have got the results seen today. A 70% decrease in outright severe poverty. I mean, that is amazing.
              This is one thing which fucks me off about Labour. Every year you waste pussyfooting around with half and quarter measures, you are effectively and statistically condemning thousands of young people to poor whole-of-life outcomes.
              As an example, Labour is going to build 100,000 in 10 years. I mean WTF. It seems like a completely arbitrary round number not anchored in any operational detail (and I bet it is a number that someone thought was manageable but wouldn’t depress middle class investment asset prices).
              You’ve got 160,000 unemployed people FFS. Build that shit in 5 or 6 years.
      2. I’m pleased key isn’t going because he would embarrass us all with his fakery and I can’t stand him fawning around trying to be the big man. Key is not my leader and not someone I respect, in fact the sooner he fucks off the better.
        RIP Hugo and thank goodness you won’t have our slippery snake fake crying when your people say goodbye.
      3. Colonial Viper28
        RT’s “Breaking the Set”.
        Special on Hugo Chavez from 15:00 in. Interesting point that Hugo Chavez opened the doors for indigenous/black heads of state in Latin America. Where before heads of state were almost invariably white.
        CEPR report on Venezuela after 10 years of Chavez rule:
        During the current economic expansion, the poverty rate has been cut by more than half, from 54 percent of households in the first half of 2003 to 26 percent at the end of 2008. Extreme poverty has fallen even more, by 72 percent. These poverty rates measure only cash income, and do not take into account increased access to health care or education.
        also
        Over the decade, the government’s total public debt has fallen from 30.7 to 14.3 percent of GDP. The foreign public debt has fallen even more, from 25.6 to 9.8 percent of GDP
        (largely due to Chavez’ nationalisation of oil assets)
      4. Murray Olsen29
        Since Yoani Sanchez has been mentioned in relation to Chavez, Cuba, and Brazil, here’s an article about one of the Brazilian politicians who sponsored her trip to Brazil. Sorry that it’s in Portuguese (maybe use a translation tool), but basically he’s telling black militants they should just go back to the zoo.
        PS. Everything I have written about Brazil and Chavez in these threads has been approved by and discussed with a Brazilian from Rio Grande do Norte, before posting. These are not just the idle thoughts of some gringo, but a commentary informed by several years working in Rio and São Paulo, in places ranging from the Paulista favela of Paraisópolis to the campus of the Universidade de São Paulo, and by stays of various lengths in places from Florianópolis in the south to Fortaleza in the northeast. If I’m wrong in what I post here, it’s not out of ignorance of the situation.
        • prism29.1
          Murray Olsen
          Did you spend any time in Curitiba sough of Sao Paolo. I heard a very positive report on the city’s mayor on Radionz from previous Parliamentary Commissioner for the Environment in 2002 Morgan Williams.
          • Murray Olsen29.1.1
            Yep, I spent a little time in Curitiba. It’s one of the most European of Brazilian cities, and the ex Mayor, Jaime Lerner, did a lot for urban development and basic habitation. As governor of the State of Paraná, Lerner and one of his successors, Roberto Requião, did a lot to keep transgenic soy beans out of the state. Even though they were respecting Federal Law by doing this, when they checked all the soy beans being exported through the port of Paranaguá, it caused huge disruption on the roads. Lula’s federal government put huge pressure on them to let the Monsanto rubbish through to the ships.
            On the negative side, I did hear anecdotal stories of the Paraná police turning back migrants from the Northeast of the country at the Curitiba bus stations, but I have never seen this documented. Curitiba has a reputation as the most boring city in Brazil ðŸ™‚
            • prism29.1.1.1
              Murray O
              Boring Curitiba eh, if I was in Syria I would think that was heaven. There is so much pressure on leaders that someone who merely tries to strike a fair course and gets there sometimes is a hero.
              • Murray Olsen29.1.1.1.1
                I didn’t find it boring, but it didn’t have the lovely chaotic qualities of other Brazilian cities. I have a sneaking suspicion that those who call it boring are a bit jealous.
      5. peterlepaysan30
        Key is a Wall Street puppet performing as his Wall Street and Washington puppet masters and mistresses want him to.
        Some pull his strings.
        Some use him like a glove puppet.
        No wonder, as NZ tourism minister he spends his holidays in Hawaii.
      6. Roy31
        I remember reading somewhere that Jim Bolger became personal mates with Bush Senior at the State Funeral of either Andropov or Chernenko. The fact that Bolger and Bush Senior were at the funeral of a leader of the USSR shows that the protocol is that if a head of state dies, you attend the funeral, no matter how much you oppose their ideology. Okay, the USSR was a bigger player on the world stage, but Key was already in South America. Sending someone else would only be excusable if Key was busy in New Zealand (as if he is ever busy anywhere). His failure to attend the funeral was a disgrace. He has shamed our nation.
      7. prism32
        Trouble is he has strayed too far away from his focus groups who would have made up his mind for him.
      8. Te Reo Putake33
        In news completely unrelated to Key’s no show at the funeral; this just in:http://en.apa.az/news_venezuela_bans_alcohol_for_period_of_cha_189098.html
      9. xtasy34
        John Key planned to visit Mexico, Colombia, Chile and Brazil according to this link:
        He apparently already had to cut short his visit to Chile, heading to meet President Pinera (son of a minister who served under the Pinochet era government!), just to get some photos and say some nice words for the media and protocol. Pinera is heading to the funeral, despite Chile’s rather conservative government not feeling all that warm towards Chavez and his party.
        Indeed almost all of Latin American and Caribbean LEADERS seem to be heading for the funeral:
        As Brazil is his next destiantion and President Roussef also supposed to travel to Venezuela, is Brazil going to be taken off the list, and will Key head home early then?
        In any case, it looks stupid to have Key make the decision he made. But does anyone really wonder, given his background and actual true agendas and priorities?
        At least he could have sent Nathan Guy off to represent NZ there in Caracas, given he is next highest NZ official there at present (in South America).
        But do not blame Key, at least he honestly shows his coulours and intentions for a change.
        • Murray Olsen34.1
          Dilma should translate Key into Portuguese and call him Senhor Chave. When Condoleeza Rice said something stupid, they called her Condoleeza Arroz.
      10. geoff35
        The real shame is that Key is missing out on seeing how a man who championed for the people gets celebrated. It might have had a positive effect on him.
      11. peterlepaysan36
        Key epitomises Wall Street ethics.
      12. millsy37
        So anyone know who represented NZ at Chavez’s funeral?
        To be honest, I doubt that the people of Venuzuela would have wanted Key at his funeral. He is completely against what HC stood for.
        Though Labour are no better. There seems to be no acknowledgement of his death on Red Alert or the LP website, given that he was probably more closer to Savage, Fraser, Nash and Kirk than Mallard, Curran and Shearer will ever be.
        Its a pity Helen didnt forge any links with the Bolivarian Republic when she was in power/office. An oil for milk powder deal seems to me to be a win/win, and Chavez would have our historical social security system to use as a template.
        • Murray Olsen37.1
          Shearer wouldn’t have gone. Helen may have. If she’d proposed a milk for oil deal, I can imagine the righties screaming, but selling it for dollars somehow doesn’t cause a peep.
          Labour should be ashamed of their 1984 past. Why is it that the front bench seem far more ashamed of what they did before then? I can’t wait for the rest of the left to get big enough that they can be ignored. Or for them to change, but I think that’s the less likely option.
      13. Colonial Viper38
        I can’t wait for the rest of the left to get big enough that they can be ignored.
        Agree with the sentiment, with the distinction that Labour is not a left wing party: it is a centrist political party sympathetic to the ongoing use of free markets and orthodox economic mechanisms and objectives.
        • ordinary_bloke38.1
          +1
          Key hugely over-rates himself. A small-town boy from a small country living off fables from his Merrill days left the Presidents of Mexico and Chile looking distinctly bored, underwhelmed, and disengaged in his presence.
          They don’t need a NZ’er to tell them about Merrill.
          Key’s lack of empathy and understanding of America Latina was further demonstrated in his gauche response to Chavez’s funeral.
          Apart from reports of sales of LAV’s to Colombia, it is starting to look like a diplomatic disaster.
          Images of Colombian ceremonial guard in Prussian coal-scuttle helmets leads to questions of who exactly it is that we are dealing with over there.
          The trip would otherwise have had the effect of distancing him from the scandal of emails released on the Standard showing that, during the Hobbit “dispute” the Government and others lied to the people of New Zealand to maintain a perception of a crisis.
          This must have been the last thing Key’s PR agencies wanted.
          Has anyone noted the number of beneficiary-bashing advertisements around ?
          There is always Brasil, but don’t hold your breath.
        • Murray Olsen38.2
          Yeah, that was sloppy of me. However, to the extent that many of the people in Aotearoa in need of left wing solutions still look to Labour, they are still a party of the left. I hope it becomes clearer that this is mainly illusion and wishful thinking, and that parties more deserving of the label become more influential.
      14. Roy40
        I’m not impressed by a pic in the Dom-Post this morning of Key strolling past a Chilean honour guard and not even wearing a necktie. He is an embarrassment to the office of Prime Minister. They are probably thinking ‘What a slob’.
      15. Sam41
        [r0b: updated on request of Sam]